The Sages have said:

Feb
10

I may remark then, that our Rabbis with one voice accept and affirm the opinion that the prophet is speaking of the King Messiah, and we ourselves shall adhere to the same view.

Rabbi Mosheh El-Sheikh

[Rabbi Mosheh El-Sheikh regarding Yesha’yahu 53 in the Tanakh]

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The Sages have said:

Feb
10

In the Code of Jewish Law1 it is written that a Torah scroll should be held in one's right arm (and rested on the right shoulder). This applies even if the one holding the Torah is left-handed. There are two verses that allude to this idea:1) "From His right hand was a fiery Law for them" -- Deuteronomy 33:2. The Torah was given from G‑d's right hand, as it were, and we therefore hold it in our right hand, too.2) "And His right hand will embrace me" -- Song of Songs 2:6. G‑d embraces us with His right hand, and we, in turn, embrace His holy Torah with our right hand.

Rabbi Yisroel Cotlar

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Fasting and Yom Kippur

Sep
17

During discussions of Yom Kippur several years ago, an argument was presented that nowhere does the Scripture indicate that fasting is a requirement of Yom Kippur. This struck me as an odd thing, even dangerous. I had not even heard such a thing before. I didn’t know that there was any debate over this issue among observant Jews. I knew that some Reformed Jews would casually work and not fast o­n Yom Kippur, but was not aware that there were other groups in the Jewish community that did not believe that fasting was a requirement of Yom Kippur.

Certainly the idea of fasting o­n Yom Kippur is an age old “tradition” among the more observant of both Jews and some Gentiles. There are even some “Christian” groups that fast o­n this day. Some groups fast o­n a regular basis, either for health or spiritual benefit, multiple times a year – even weekly.

The instructions in question for Yom Kippur are in the following texts:

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Lashon HaRa

Aug
21

Many people that come out of pagan practices and into a Torah observant life through teshuva (repentance), choose to take on a Hebrew name for themselves based on Proverbs 22:1. Isolated, it appears that this is a correct interpretation of the passage, and there was a time when I interpretted the same way. There are several limited examples in the body of scripture where Elohim gave someone a new name: Abram:Abraham, Sarai:Sarah, Jacob:Israel, etc... And there are others within the Midrashim.

Proverbs (Mishle) 22:
1 A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than silver and gold.

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S'micha

Nov
01

'''Semicha''' ("leaning [of the hands]"), also semichut ( "ordination"), or semicha lerabbanut ("rabbinical ordination") is derived from a Hebrew word which means to "rely on" or "to be authorized". It generally refers to the ordination of a rabbi within Judaism. In this sense it is the "transmission" of rabbinic authority to give advice or judgment in Jewish law.

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The Sages have said:

I may remark then, that our Rabbis with one voice accept and affirm the opinion that the prophet is speaking of the King Messiah, and we ourselves shall adhere to the same view.

Rabbi Mosheh El-Sheikh

[Rabbi Mosheh El-Sheikh regarding Yesha’yahu 53 in the Tanakh]