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Initial Reactions to Ovid, “The Transformation of Daphne into a Laurel,” an excerpt from Book 1 of The Metamorphoses, ca. 2 C.E. (poetry)

Jul
26

I am particularly attracted to works from this period due to relationships from mythology that can be attributed to families of giants from religious literature predating the period.  I find that Ovid has captured a common theme that was reflective in the texts of Sepher Ha Yashar (Jasher 2:20) relating to women not wanting to raise children, and the desire of those titans, demi-gods, or sons of the gods, to procreate with the most beautiful of women available.    The parallels between the themes in the ancient texts and this classical period work are fascinating, giving the impression that there may be a basis in the ancient religious texts to the mythology found in later periods. 

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The Sages have said:

In the Code of Jewish Law1 it is written that a Torah scroll should be held in one's right arm (and rested on the right shoulder). This applies even if the one holding the Torah is left-handed. There are two verses that allude to this idea:1) "From His right hand was a fiery Law for them" -- Deuteronomy 33:2. The Torah was given from G‑d's right hand, as it were, and we therefore hold it in our right hand, too.2) "And His right hand will embrace me" -- Song of Songs 2:6. G‑d embraces us with His right hand, and we, in turn, embrace His holy Torah with our right hand.

Rabbi Yisroel Cotlar